Three classes of vocalized pause

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You don’t notice when people don’t say “um” and “uh” and “you know.” When they do, though, they can really interfere with listening because they break the flow. Those are the obvious “vocalized pauses,” but there are others that will interfere for a different reason, and they can be even harder for a speaker to notice and eliminate.

The first step in dealing with them is recognizing them. Let’s look at three classes of vocalized pauses. Continue reading “Three classes of vocalized pause”

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Bonus: Reduce fillers in your speech

Take a look at this article from The Art of Manliness blog. Yes, it’s gender-centric. But the advice is good for anyone, and really is more properly focused toward men. As the article notes, men are much more likely to use filled pauses (ums, uhs, etc.) than women.

So try to look past any perceived bias to the pragmatic explanation of where filled pauses come from and what to do about them. Just read Becoming Well-Spoken: How to Minimize Your Uh’s and Um’s by Brett and Kate McKay (does it help that the co-author is female?).

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